Flower market on the "Amstelveld"

Flower market on the "Amstelveld"

Every Monday morning there is a small but pretty market on the Amstelveld.

You will find not only flowers, plants and bulbs, but also cheese, chocolates, honey, french sausages etc.

We often go there for the eatable flowers, we use in our kitchen.


Fort Negen

Fort Negen, new bakery opened in april 2021. They work with organic products and all "desem" breads are handmade in the open kitchen. Our favorite is the farmhouse bread with toasted rye flour. You must try the various croissants too!

Fort Negen, nieuwe bakker geopend in april 2021 op de Jan Evertsenstraat te Amsterdam. Zij werken met bioprodukten en alle "desembroden" worden met de hand gemaakt in de openkeuken. De verschillende croissants zijn ook zeer de moeite waard.

Onze favoriet is het boerenbrood met getoast roggemeel en de verschillende croissants.


Barba di frate

“Barba di frate” een heerlijke italiaanse zeegroente heerlijk bij visgerechten, pasta’s of te gebruiken in salades.


Rainarai

Rainairai opens new shop at The Westerstreet in Amsterdam. Go in and you smell the lovely spices from the Algerian kitchen.


Winter the season for oranges

Citrus Varieties

Citrus is one of the world’s most loved fruit tree.

The Navel orange gets its name from the hole at the base of the fruit that encloses a miniature, underdeveloped secondary fruit (resembling a human navel).  They have a rich, juicy flavour and rough, bright orange skins that are easy to peel.

Valencia

The Valencia is named after the Spanish city of Valencia, although its true origin remains unknown. It has thinner skin than the Navel, is generally sweet and commonly cultivated for the production of juice. Tarocco Blood Orange

The Italian Tarocco blood orange has striking, red flesh that develops during the cold winter nights. It is tender and juicy, with a flavour reminiscent of strawberry.

Seville

The common bitter Seville orange is widely grown in Spain. The bitter taste makes it an excellent choice for marmalade or other spreads. Petitgrain essential oil is distilled from the leaves, while oil of neroli is extracted from the flowers. The dried flowers are used to make tea in China.


Lemon verbena

Lemon verbena has a bright, slightly sweet, herbaceous flavour with a distinct hint of lemon. Despite its strong lemon scent, this citrusy herb has a far less aggressive lemon flavor than lemon balm, lemon thyme, lemon mint, and lemongrass.

This lemon-scented herb has a number of culinary uses ranging from rich roasts to sweet citrusy desserts and jams. Lemon verbena can be used to make flavourful olive oil-based salad dressings, subtle lemon ice cream, and lemon verbena jelly, as well as season poultry dishes, salsa verde, and soups. It can be used in place of lemon zest or dried lemon as a more subtle addition to dishes, or infused into pantry ingredients like sugar and vinegar.

In Europe and other global destinations, tea lovers combine lemon verbena leaves with hot water to create a popular herbal tea known as Louisa in England, “te de cedron” in Mexican kitchens, and Luiza in Greek households. This kind of tea is also popular among French, Spanish, and Italian drinkers. Lemon verbena can also be used to make a flavorful iced tea or lemonade made with fresh lemon juice, lemon verbena, simple syrup, and mint leaves.

Lemon verbena tea made with fresh lemon verbena leaves and boiling water is commonly used to relieve the symptoms of colds including chills, fever, and congestion. Lemon verbena essential oil is also used topically to relieve muscle pain.


turmeric

Though having only recently entered the mainstream as the ingredient of the moment, turmeric – or Curcuma longa as it’s known by its biological name – has been used for millennia everywhere from China and India to Jamaica and West Africa. While it’s likely that just about every bite of curry you’ve tasted in your lifetime contains turmeric, there is archaeological evidence indicating its use over 4 500 years ago. It has also long been used as a sacred root for body embellishment during cultural ceremonies. The Hindu tradition of Haldi, for example, sees the bride and groom having a tincture of oil, water and turmeric applied to their bodies as a blessing before their wedding.

Other than its gastronomical and religious uses, turmeric was grown and harvested as a natural textile dye – for centuries the distinctive yellow of Buddhist robes got their colour from turmeric. In contemporary fashion circles, one of the world’s largest fashion dye houses, Tintoria di Quaregna in Italy, has made headlines for its return to plant-based formulas with turmeric featuring prominently. Hip cosmetics brands such as NARS, Kiehl’s and Urban Decay have also been inspired by turmeric’s ancient cultural use as a beauty aid (it’s said to get skin glowing) and incorporated it into everything from make-up and foundation to face masks and moisturisers.

And then there is the evidence-based healing and health properties of turmeric, long used in the practice of natural medicine – in particular Ayurveda, the Indian system of holistic healing. Curcumin, the compound responsible for turmeric’s vivid colour, is known to have potent antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-bacterial properties. This is a plant that packs a lot of punch!

HOW TO USE TURMERIC

Turmeric is on-trend, versatile, mild and earthy.

  • Concoct a warm tea or iced tea with thinly sliced fresh turmeric and ginger, sweeten with honey.
  • Make your favourite curry paste using turmeric and coconut oil. Store in a jar in the refrigerator and use in a sauce or when you make chicken, prawn or any other curry
  • Add a bit of grated turmeric and cardamom to hot chocolate for a mild earthy flavour.
  • For a pick-me-up a wellness shot mix grated turmeric, ginger and freshly squeezed orange juice. Add a little cayenne pepper at the end. Fresh mango or pineapple juice works just as well.
  • Mix turmeric and paprika and sprinkle over cauliflower florets. Season with salt and pepper and a drizzle of olive oil and lemon juice. Roast in the oven at 180 degrees in the oven on a tray until golden brown. You can do the same with butternut or pumpkin.
  • Add to carrot, pumpkin, corn or sweet potato soup.
  • Spice up breakfast by adding a teaspoon or two of freshly grated turmeric to your flapjacks recipe. Serve with ginger honey.
  • Garnish your favourite cocktail with a ribbon of fresh turmeric just before serving and watch the colour change. Magic.
  • Add a bit of turmeric for your Asian style broth or any mash such as potato, sweet potato, pumpkin or carrot and potato.

GROWING TURMERIC

  • Turmeric is a fast grower, shooting new growth from the tubers in early summer. They can quickly grow up to two metres within a few weeks.
  • Turmeric is easy to grow during the warm summer months when plants will need regular watering. Grow tubers in pots with a fertile compost mix that drains well. Tubers should be kept dry when they are dormant.
  • We love turmeric because it’s such an easy grower. The leaves are very attractive but it’s the flowers that are the real show-stoppers. They’re like hidden gems between tall, lush growth.
  • It’s a little known fact, but the flowers also taste good!

Bakery Noé

Noé is a 100% organic boulangerie and patisserie in Amsterdam. They have three locations with the latest just opening on the Bloemgracht.

They pride themselves on using the best ingredients and following traditional methods.

They have a selection of breads, rolls and pastries using different flours and techniques so that each is unique.

Not only can you enjoy their beautiful baked goods, but you can also enjoy a take away coffee.

We absolutely love their financiers - delicate little cakes made with almonds and beurre noisette. We treat ourselves now and and again to one on our way to work to enjoy with a cup of coffee.

Find Noé at the following locations:

Vijzelgracht 20 - Boulangerie & Pâtisserie
Gustav Malherlaan 399 - Boulangerie & Pâtisserie, sandwiches & coffees/teas
Bloemgracht 2 - Boulangerie & Pâtisserie

For more information, visit: www.boulangerienoe.com


Vegetable Boxes from Lindenhoff

Our friends at Lindenhoff have two fantastic boxes available at restaurant prices, both filled with seasonal products. The first called ‘Hollandse Glorie’ or Dutch Pride is filled with onions, potatoes, leeks, Belgian endive, carrots and garlic and retails now for €11,25. The other box is the ‘knollen bundel’ or root vegetable box filled with Jerusalem artichoke, parsnip, celeriac and salsify. It retails for €12,25. You can order the boxes through us and pick them up from our venue at the Westergas. The first person to order a box via us will get another box free as a gift. Email us at bernadette@amsterdamflavours.com to order. Please order before 18.00 so that the delivery can be ordered for the following day.


Sophie Eats

Sophie Eats is a new deli that has opened up in Amsterdam's Rivierenbuurt.

Sophie trained at Leith's in London and started catering from a shared kitchen in the city. She has quickly built up an name and good reputation for food that not only tastes good but looks beautiful too.

She recently realised her dream of opening her own deli where she serves her delicious cakes, salads and great coffee, alongside the fact that she now has her own kitchen from which to do all her catering.

Visit her beautiful deli. It's friendly, warm and inviting, just like Sophie is in person.

 

 


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