Lemon verbena

Lemon verbena has a bright, slightly sweet, herbaceous flavour with a distinct hint of lemon. Despite its strong lemon scent, this citrusy herb has a far less aggressive lemon flavor than lemon balm, lemon thyme, lemon mint, and lemongrass.

This lemon-scented herb has a number of culinary uses ranging from rich roasts to sweet citrusy desserts and jams. Lemon verbena can be used to make flavourful olive oil-based salad dressings, subtle lemon ice cream, and lemon verbena jelly, as well as season poultry dishes, salsa verde, and soups. It can be used in place of lemon zest or dried lemon as a more subtle addition to dishes, or infused into pantry ingredients like sugar and vinegar.

In Europe and other global destinations, tea lovers combine lemon verbena leaves with hot water to create a popular herbal tea known as Louisa in England, “te de cedron” in Mexican kitchens, and Luiza in Greek households. This kind of tea is also popular among French, Spanish, and Italian drinkers. Lemon verbena can also be used to make a flavorful iced tea or lemonade made with fresh lemon juice, lemon verbena, simple syrup, and mint leaves.

Lemon verbena tea made with fresh lemon verbena leaves and boiling water is commonly used to relieve the symptoms of colds including chills, fever, and congestion. Lemon verbena essential oil is also used topically to relieve muscle pain.


Vegetable Boxes from Lindenhoff

Our friends at Lindenhoff have two fantastic boxes available at restaurant prices, both filled with seasonal products. The first called ‘Hollandse Glorie’ or Dutch Pride is filled with onions, potatoes, leeks, Belgian endive, carrots and garlic and retails now for €11,25. The other box is the ‘knollen bundel’ or root vegetable box filled with Jerusalem artichoke, parsnip, celeriac and salsify. It retails for €12,25. You can order the boxes through us and pick them up from our venue at the Westergas. The first person to order a box via us will get another box free as a gift. Email us at bernadette@amsterdamflavours.com to order. Please order before 18.00 so that the delivery can be ordered for the following day.


Sophie Eats

Sophie Eats is a new deli that has opened up in Amsterdam's Rivierenbuurt.

Sophie trained at Leith's in London and started catering from a shared kitchen in the city. She has quickly built up an name and good reputation for food that not only tastes good but looks beautiful too.

She recently realised her dream of opening her own deli where she serves her delicious cakes, salads and great coffee, alongside the fact that she now has her own kitchen from which to do all her catering.

Visit her beautiful deli. It's friendly, warm and inviting, just like Sophie is in person.

 

 


Levain et le vin

Levain et le vin is a new bread and wine store in the city. We say bread and wine, but it's actually much more than that. It's homemade sourdough breads and focaccia and the most amazing cinnamon buns!!

The wines sold or all natural wines, meaning that there are no additives and the process happens naturally.

They also have a cafe/coffee corner and where they serve great coffee and delicious sandwiches using their own homemade bread.

Visit Levain et le vin at Jan Pieter Heijestraat 168, Amsterdam

https://www.levainetlevin.com


Friese Palingroker

Down the lengths and breadths of the Amsterdam Canals, cruises a man selling his wares. Bas Oosterbaan, aka de Friese Palingroker (Eel smoker from Friesland) is a colourful, passionate and genuine character who exudes warmth and excitement for what he does.

From his tiny boat, which is more equipped than you think, he sells his extraordinary home-smoked products. It naturally started with eel, which he is most famous for. It's delicate in flavour, not over seasoned or smoked.

Then there's cured and smoked gravadlax, hot smoked salmon, smoked goose breast, rilette (pulled goose) and confined goose leg.

Certainly a man of many talents. Look out for him on the Amsterdam Canals every Thursday, Friday and Saturday.

www.friesepalingroker.nl 

 


Mama Bakery

Mama Bakery produces organic artisan bread and pastries. A small team of dedicated bakers and patissiers work with love and passion.

We have an old colleague who manages their kitchen, so when we heard they have a stall at the Zuidermarkt every Saturday, we decided to go and see for ourselves. We didn't require much convincing because all their products are made using the best quality ingredients, such as flour from Dutch mills. All their goods are baked to perfection.

You can either go and visit them at their stall at the Zuidermarkt each Saturday, just as we did, or if you're willing to travel a little further, you can visit their bakery and store in Zwanenburg.

bakkerijmama.nl


Biltong

Biltong is a form of dried, cured meat that originated in Southern African countries (South Africa, Zimbabwe and Zambia). Various types of meat are used to produce it, ranging from beef and game meats to fillets of meat cut into strips following the grain of the muscle, or flat pieces sliced across the grain. It is related to beef jerky in that they are both spiced, dried meats; however, the typical ingredients, taste and production processes may differ.

The word biltong is from the Dutch bil ("buttock”") and tong ("strip" or "tongue").

Meat preservation as a survival technique dates back to ancient times. Indigenous peoples of Southern Africa, such as the Khoikhoi, preserved meat by slicing it into strips, curing it with salt, and hanging it up to dry. European seafarers preserved meat for their long journeys by curing meat in salt or brine. European settlers (Dutch, German, French) who arrived in southern Africa in the early 17th century used vinegar in the curing process, as well as saltpetre (potassium nitrate). The potassium nitrate in saltpeter kills Clostridium botulinum, the deadly bacterium that causes botulism while the acidity of the vinegar inhibits its growth. According to the World Health Organization, C. botulinum will not grow in acidic conditions (pH less than 4.6), therefore the toxin will not be formed in acidic foods. The antimicrobial properties of certain spices have also been drawn upon since ancient times. The spices introduced to biltong by the Dutch include pepper, coriander, and cloves.

The need for food preservation in South Africa was pressing. Building up herds of livestock took a long time, but with game in abundance in South Africa, traditional methods were called upon to preserve the meat of large African animals such as the eland in a warm climate. Iceboxes and refrigerators had not been invented yet. Biltong as it is today evolved from the dried meat carried by the wagon-travelling Voortrekkers, who needed stocks of durable food as they migrated from the Cape Colony north and north-eastward (away from British rule) into the interior of Southern Africa during the Great Trek. The meat was preserved and hung to be dried for a fortnight during the colder winter, with the cold temperatures aiding to further inhibit bacterial and fungal growth. Once suitably dried, the biltong was ready for packing in cloth bags, which allow air circulation to prevent mould.

While biltong is usually eaten as a snack, it can also be diced up into stews, or added to muffins or pot bread. Biltong-flavoured potato crisps have also been produced, and there are cheese spreads with biltong flavour. Finely shredded biltong is eaten on slices of bread and in sandwiches.

Biltong can be used as a teething aid for babies.

Biltong is a high-protein food.


Bilder & de Clercq's New Recipes week 35 - 2017

As the chefs of Bilder & de Clercq, we develop new recipes for them every week. We'll keep you updated with the week's newest recipes. This weeks recipes are:

KofteCalabrese SausagesThai Mussels


Breda-Amsterdam

Restaurant Breda, situated in the centre of Amsterdam, offers modern international cuisine in a relaxed atmosphere. You can choose between 3 menus carefully compiled and executed by the chefs.

They have over 15 wines available to order by the glass, wine pairing with the menu and more than 60 wines on the list from all over the world.

The food is simple yet delicious with surprising combinations and attention to detail. We thoroughly enjoyed our dinner which used the best and freshest of the season's ingredients. Also the prefect choice for lunch! A restaurant we wouldn't hesitate to return to.


Daalder in the Jordaan

At Daalder, situated on the Lindengracht in Amsterdam's vibrant Jordan district, you can expect fine, Michelin-quality cuisine in a down to earth environment. They serve either a 5-or 7- course menu, made with beautiful fresh ingredients, all hand picked by their head chef and co-owner from Paris, Dennis Huwaë.

His dishes are like works of art and with their many flavours and textures, his creations are a delight to the palate. They do things a little differently at Daalder. Their superb dishes are served with a smile in a joyful, unpretentious atmosphere.

The wine menu is created by Maitre Sommelier Tim Grashuis, who is also responsible for the widely acclaimed great service at Daalder.