Editor's Rating

8.9

Chicken Soup, otherwise known as Jewish penicillin, is one of those dishes which is surrounded by mysticism. Jewish mothers would prepare a large pot of this golden liquid to give to their children when they were not well. It has been scientifically proven that chicken soup contains many of the same properties as penicillin, so it is in essence, the perfect medicine. This is actually a ‘poor man’s soup’. Once a week on the Sabbath or for special holidays, the chicken and vegetables would be used to make a flavourful soup. The soup would then be strained and served as a clear broth to start the meal. The reserved chicken and vegetables would then be served as the main course.

Serves 6-8 

Ingredients
1 chicken, about 1 kg in weight
2 leeks
3-4 sticks celery
1 carrot
4 small turnips
1 bunch flat leaf parsley
2-3 organic chicken stock cubes, according to taste
water, to cover
salt and pepper

Method
Wash the leeks and celery and finely slice. Peel the carrot and turnips and cut into small dice. Finely chop the flat leaf parsley.

Place the chicken and vegetables in a pressure cooker or large pot. Add water to cover, the stock cubes, salt and pepper. If using a pressure cooker, place on the lid, bring to the boil and cook for 30 minutes. If using a conventional pot, bring to the boil and simmer gently for about 2 hours, skimming off any scum which forms on the top.

Remove the chicken and pick the meat off the bones. Return the meat to the soup and check the seasoning. Serve in large bowls and you’ll be feeling better in no time.

To bulk the soup up, you can always add some broken spaghetti or other pasta of your choice. Traditionally the soup is served with matzah balls.

Make a large pot, as the soups freezes beautifully and it’s always good to have some at hand.

We, the Amsterdam Flavours chefs, hope you enjoy this recipe as much as we do. If you have any questions on how to prepare it or just want to send us your feedback, you can reach us here Contact Amsterdam Flavours

 

5 (100%) 1 vote